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Question 10A sensory signal (whether chemical, auditory; visual etc) can only be detected by the relevant sensory neuron if: there are no other signals present the ...

Question

Question 10A sensory signal (whether chemical, auditory; visual etc) can only be detected by the relevant sensory neuron if: there are no other signals present the signal to noise ratio is high the observer is awake the signal to noise ratio is low the afferent neuron is depolarised

Question 10 A sensory signal (whether chemical, auditory; visual etc) can only be detected by the relevant sensory neuron if: there are no other signals present the signal to noise ratio is high the observer is awake the signal to noise ratio is low the afferent neuron is depolarised



Answers

Which of the following neuron parts receive(s) signals from sensory receptors of other neurons? a. cell body b. axon c. dendrites d. Both a and c are correct.

This question asked. When a sensory neuron receives a stimulus that brings it to threshold, it will do all of the following except a become de polarized bi trans deuce. The stimulus to an actual potential see inhibit the spread of the action potential to the other sensory neurons, or D caused the release of neurotransmitters onto cells in the central nervous system. So if we are trying to locate the incorrect statement right, we have to look at each statement evaluated, determine if it's true or false. They become your d polarized, right? This is true because when we have a stimulus that is going to reach the threshold off the actual potential. So the neuron is going to fire due to the stainless being president, the way the neuron fires, it becomes dipole arrest, meaning that the resting membrane potential, um, which could be somewhere around negative 55 million votes or so right. This resting memory and potential if we're looking at a graph, is going to shoot up very high up. And if we have zero right at this line by zero Miller volts and negative 55 being right down here and with let's say 40 Mila votes up here, right? We're going to find that this as soon as the stimulus hips, we're going to dip down a little bit and then boom skyrocket all the way up to the the maximum of our action potential. This is going to be the deep polarisation facing. Well, um, go over that in just a minute here and then we'll see that our, um our polarity of the membrane is going to decrease after that. And then it will dip a little bit lower than the rest of memory potential and then get back up to where it needs to be. And then after that refractory period, it will be ready for firing once more. So this right here is known as deep polarization. We have deep polarized membrane, meaning that we have, um, allowed for the ions to move along their respective concentration radiance. So that is why we see this increase 20 from negativity five. And then this deep polarisation continues all the way up to 40. And then we see a decrease back down as we polarized membrane again using our sodium potassium pumps on. And that's how we get there. So Yes, twice A is true. They transducer this thing list in action potential. That's true as well, right? Because we're going to transducer or convert the stimulus into another signal in the form of an action potential. And that's what we're seeing right here. And that's the action potential. So you ask, Try to be is true as well. Now choice D They caused releases neurotransmitters onto cells in the CNS. That's true as well, because if we think about what happens at synapse, well, if we are going to have an action potential reaches enough. A neurotransmitter can be released, uh, at the synaptic at, um as a synthetic physical right. It will leave the synapse or leave the, um, synaptic button on one off the I'm descending neuron. And then it will trans verse the synapse as a physical, and then it will be taken up by the dendrite of another neuron. So that's how the neurotransmitter work. So this is true as well. So the only thing that is not true is choice. See, that means that it is going to be our answer and why is not true? Well, because the stimulus is not going to inhibit the spread of the action potential. It's actually going to allow for that action potential to go because it triggers the action potential. Once that threshold is reached, the action potential is triggered, so Choice C is going to be our answer.

So this little exercise when we're talking about the senses, we are just working our way through a bit of a concept map and at the top of the concept map we have sensory receptors which else abbreviate is since rests for sensory receptors and there was gonna break this up into the categories and just talk a little bit about it as we go on. So on the very left side we're going to have sub category A which I'll just draw a little line here and it's left blank. But what we do know is that below it, we have some more information about it. So it's involved in touch hearing in balance so that those are the clues that we are given for what subcategory of sensory receptors this letter A is referring to and what we should notice is that these three different things, these are going to be mechanical stimuli. So yeah, we're thinking about more purely physical and the word mechanical is a is a big clue for the kind of receptor because this is actually going to be what we call Nakano receptors and I'll just abbreviate this as here's our e makino and then receptors is kind of indicated or expected and I'll make this little cleaner for us since we're gonna have to look at it for a little while longer and again think about mechanical, think about physical sort of stimuli and that's what we're looking at here. Okay and let's just continue with this theme before we talk about some other subcategories and when we're talking about these different stimuli are sorry these different receptors, we have a letter F which is going to be referring to the actual physical ah nature of these different receptors and many of them actually are going to be hair cells because we think about things like hearing, right? So these are the receptors in our years and a lot of these receptors are going to be that pick up your hearing or your balance in your ear. These are both located within your ear. These are going to be hair cells so he would might see them as indicated in the picture, something like this and this. These little hair like um structures here allow us to have a bit of equilibrium and pick up different noises and touches and these sort of things like we might have on our skin as well, these sort of receptors. So now let's work our way on to the next subcategory which is going to be sub category B. I'm going to change the color blue for the time being. And we also have another clue for what he might be because the respective are the respective information relevant information is saying it's involved in taste and smell and this is going to be a big enough clue for us to solve this problem because if you think about the different physiology between touching, hearing versus tasting and smelling is these are going to be caused by physical stimuli and I guess B is going to be caused by physical stimuli as well, but a different kind of physical uh nature. So things that taste and smell they are tasting, it's really different due to different chemicals that are present that our our body will read and interpret. So because these different chemicals, it makes sense that these are called chemo receptors and I'll just abbreviate is chemo because we're uh huh, implying that we have receptor at the end of it, because these are some categories for receptors for sensory receptors in the body and it's a different chemicals that are present in whatever substance you're consuming that gives different taste and smell. So that is how we work through that. We also have ah branch see where we're talking about another kind of since the receptors where it's this isn't actually see this is just going to be pain the pain and thermal receptors. So these are a little more obvious piece in their name is going to be pain, painful stimuli. You have pain is uh being enacted on our body or difference in temperature and we can talk a little bit more about that. These are just founded the human skin, that's all we really need to know, which makes perfect sense. Just the location. But let's move on to the last category which I will do in black for this concept map and then we will just continue on with some more exercises after this if you would like to stick along. So we're told the category this time you have electro magnetic, which makes sense because if you go into the realms of physics little bit we learned that electricity and magnetism are kind of like two sides of the same coin. They're very heavily related. So it makes sense that the physiology but for these two different stimuli could be sub categorized into one type of receptors and these are going to be sensitive to some different stimuli. It's all right to sense. To let me have a few different options here. You have three different blanks to fill which we're going to be labeled, see D. N. F. C. D. Any. So the first two are going to be pretty obvious in my opinion, based on the name of the receptors or we're going to have electricity. Right? So electrical stimuli and the electricity we can just understand is the flow of electrons. Non magnetism is we don't need to really delve into what that might be at a more foundational level. We just can understand that based on the nature of uh that's right, magnetic for this magnetic based on the nature of the sense of the sensors receptor. Sorry. Uh of course it's going to pick up electricity and magnetism, those sort of stimuli and also light because light, which makes a lot of sense, is heavily played into electricity. You think about the nature of what causes like to form photons flowing flows of electrons as well. These sort of things we picked up by these electromagnetic receptors. Okay. And those in the I. R. Called. So we have an example of the ones that might be found in the eye. And I would like you to try and take a second to think about what they might be called because it makes sense if we think about what sort of stimuli your eyes going to pick up. So when we when we are taking in information from the outside world, it's just simply reflected light that is being uh picked up by the receptors in our eyes. That's why when it's dark we can't really see a whole lot because it's not a whole lot of light is being reflected from an object to our eyeballs. So this is going to be heavily light related. So we can think about light is being photons. So things that will receive signal about photons, we can call photo receptors. If you think about a photo, that's where the word comes from photo and image. It's just reflected light that we're able to see at one moment in time. If we're looking at a photo, it derives from photons which is referring to light particles, so the receptors that can pick up these different like particles we will call photoreceptors in the eye makes perfect sense. And that is just a little concept map of how we start to work through the different categories and relevant information about sensor receptors that we find in the body.

Everybody. This is Ricky, and I'm gonna be walking you through Problem number two from chapter 38. And this question is asking us, um, how do you differentiate sensory information? And we can do this because our input and output structures our district And what I mean by that is we have We have specialized organs for taking in different sensory stimuli. So, like, we have no our nose for the smell odor neurons for endurance, accusatory neurons for gestation. Um, we have our eyes to see. Um, And then all of that information is sent from those original sensory input. Wiggins two, I'd like to say output structures or, um, integrators or brain regions. Essentially, that trance code the data into, um what? What? We feel our sensation. Um, So before I go to off topic, um, the brain is able to interpret nerve impulses coming from sensory receptors. Um, mainly because impulsive in originate in different sensory organs, you travel to different areas of the brain. I'm off the city. Was we'll see the next one

A lot of one. This is Ricky. And today we're working on problem number 14 from chapter 36. So oh, sensory signals, except all faction travel to the wellness before the cortex. Now, this is interesting, because if all other senses do it, why doesn't your sense of smell? And additionally, if olfaction infestation are so tightly interconnected, why wouldn't your station go through a different pathway than the foulness? Or why wouldn't olfaction go through films itself? This is actually one of fee unsolved mysteries of neuroscience that keeps researchers going, huh? So I hope this video is helpful.


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