5

Explain PEM electrolysis step by step with arrow pushing and lewis dot structure...

Question

Explain PEM electrolysis step by step with arrow pushing and lewis dot structure

explain PEM electrolysis step by step with arrow pushing and lewis dot structure



Answers

Without looking at the text, describe the steps for drawing Lewis structures.

Question 108 is a Louis. Simple question for Adam's, not molecules. You're asked to do this in a group and have everybody draw the Louis symbols for elements hydrogen through neon on the periodic table, so you should get something that looks like this. Helium has one valence. Electrons are hydrogen has one valence electron helium has to each represented with a small circle or a dot lithium. Now going to the second period just has one Valence electron beryllium has to. Boron has three. Carbon has four, and we begin to add them around one of the time until we have included one on all four sides. And then we double up. Nitrogen has five, Oxygen has six, Florian has seven and Neon has eight. The formal charge on all of these is going to be equal to zero because a formal charge of anything but zero occurs on Lee with bonding where electrons are being shared unequally because there is no bonding involved. No Covalin bonding. There's no sharing of electrons. There's no unequal sharing of electrons. Therefore, all formal charges are zero

Explain how to draw an ionic. Do this with an example. So let's take potassium iodide as an example. So what I have is potassium iodine. I know that each of these comes from potassium, which has a single valence electron iodine, which has seven. That there is a transfer of electrons from the metal to the non metal. And so potassium becomes a positively charged I on with no electrons in the village shell where it started at. So it does have a full Bayliss shell. It's just not what we show here. Um, so it had the positive potassium eye on, and then the iodine now has gained eight electrons. We show that with the eight dots around it, and we're gonna drop brackets around this symbol and that a charge to demonstrate, um that this is a charge I on. And this is how we show and I ionic move a structure. Sometimes we have Lewis structures where there is more than one of one of the ions. So, for example, if I had sodium oxide, um, what I would do is the same thing. The sodium would still become positively charged, but there are two of them. And then for the oxide, I would have all eight electrons, and then this would have a two minus charge. And so this is the way that it formed this mutual compound is I have to positive charges for every minus two charge of the oxygen.

If we have Ah, barium, boron hydroxide plus water. We can show the reaction using Lewis structures. So be O H three plus water. So water will donate electrons to boron. More hydrogen will be released and we will form B O H four plus h plus. And so B O H three is our Lewis acid. An H 20 is our Lewis base.

Hi. Are you ready to draw some Lewis structures and then use those Lewis structures to help us identify the Lewis acid and the Lewis base? In a reaction, Let's get started. I want to start off with boric acid. So drawing the Louis structure for boric acid. Boron has three valence electrons. Each oxygen brings in six, and each hydrogen will bring in one giving us a Louis structure that looks like this for the boric acid. The boric acid is reacting with water and according to the balanced equation, there actually to water molecules. So I want to draw the Louis structure. For each of those, there's one water and our second water, right. If we recall the octet rule tells us that elements, most elements, they're definitely exceptions. But most elements would like to have eight valence electrons. That is the definition of the octet rule. So when we look at Boron right now, boron on Lee has six valence electrons. When these substances react, the bond in one of our water molecules is going to break between the oxygen and the hydrogen, giving us an H plus and an O. H minus. This h minus that lone pair of electrons from where the bond broke are going to be donated and attached to the boron in this empty position. Since the O. H is donating a lone pair of electrons, it is known as the Louis Space Louis basis. Donate electrons, so just be identified as our base. The boric acid, on the other hand, is accepting the lone pair of electrons, so it is known as the Lewis acid. So we have a bond breaking in the water between the hydroxide and the hydrogen ion, and that is being bonded to the bar. Um, so then you might ask, what happens to this other hydrogen, this proton, this long proton? That's by itself. It, in turn, is going to attach to the lone pair on the other water molecule. When it does this, we can see that the water is still acting as a lone pair donor, so the water is still acting as the Lewis base, so each of these water molecules acted as a Lewis base, donating alone pair of electrons. The bore the boric acid, acted as lewis acid and the H plus ion. It was also a lone pair, except er so it acted as an acid. Let's see what the end result of this is. So on our product side swing, hammer, boron. But now our boron is going to have a full octet as it's gonna be surrounded by four oxygen's that are then attached to correspondingly four hydrogen. Okay, alright. And our other product is going to be and this is going to have a negative charge back up a second year that's gonna have a negative charge or other product is gonna be a hydro me. Um, I on or h 30 plus. All right, So there's your Lewis structures and how you use those Lewis structures to identify your Lewis acid and your Lewis base. Thanks for watching. I hope you found this helpful. Have a great day.


Similar Solved Questions

5 answers
Bromine chloride is placed out of J attemt sealed container and allowed to come to equilibrium equilibrium reaction is: The2BCKg ) and the equilibrium concentrationsBrz(g ) CI;(g )[Brcl] O5L (Brz| - 17}_ [Cl] - 173J Cakculate the equilibrium constant: Enter our J0#el aoswer 4ll parts scientific notarion: Be jute {010 {flect
Bromine chloride is placed out of J attemt sealed container and allowed to come to equilibrium equilibrium reaction is: The 2BCKg ) and the equilibrium concentrations Brz(g ) CI;(g ) [Brcl] O5L (Brz| - 17}_ [Cl] - 173J Cakculate the equilibrium constant: Enter our J0#el aoswer 4ll parts scientific n...
5 answers
HmaAnIFhauuFtUltuintFnbbntWn "utMieeeeulmhere: ufezhecur?IeANTOi GacdilfeiterAninciieDpe ol" inhibitkm cused Wy Jdelleuns C1 (IIER Alitily/4aL4clu13A Frnan FdaAubtrllanC7
HmaAnI Fhauu Ft Ultuint Fnbbnt Wn "utMieee eulmhere: ufezhecur? IeANT Oi Gac dilfeiter Aninciie Dpe ol" inhibitkm cused Wy Jdelleuns C1 (IIER Alitily/ 4aL4clu 13A Frnan Fda Aubtrllan C7...
5 answers
Squioa 0z ~c 40l+soiio Oreta 1p45MX s2E(a ao MX 0v1 MX Ovk (3 MY 0*01 (8 uSpuOJaS 00 + UI SJW 0"O1 MX 001 ajjiy8n Kwin uods 6x-0091 E Jo paads a41 abuey? 0} papaau Jamod Jau 0} S/lu 0"GL WuOJ} TF(9 241 S! Je4M 'sjujod 0z_L uonlsano aneiuenO
squioa 0z ~c 40l+soiio Oreta 1p45 MX s2E(a ao MX 0v1 MX Ovk (3 MY 0*01 (8 uSpuOJaS 00 + UI SJW 0"O1 MX 001 ajjiy8n Kwin uods 6x-0091 E Jo paads a41 abuey? 0} papaau Jamod Jau 0} S/lu 0"GL WuOJ} TF(9 241 S! Je4M 'sjujod 0z_L uonlsano aneiuenO...
5 answers
Question 13 (4.5 points) What is the molarity of NaOH that requires 21.00 mL of NaOH to titrate 0.2200 g of KHP dissolved in 100 mL of water? (KHP MW 204.24 glmol)0.06421 M0.07005 M0.05129 M0.04320 M
Question 13 (4.5 points) What is the molarity of NaOH that requires 21.00 mL of NaOH to titrate 0.2200 g of KHP dissolved in 100 mL of water? (KHP MW 204.24 glmol) 0.06421 M 0.07005 M 0.05129 M 0.04320 M...
5 answers
Q1. Find the transition matrix corresponding to the change of basis from {V1, V2, V3} to {u1, U2, Ug}, where=V2V3and U1 =U22and u33
Q1. Find the transition matrix corresponding to the change of basis from {V1, V2, V3} to {u1, U2, Ug}, where = V2 V3 and U1 = U2 2 and u3 3...
5 answers
[0/1 Points]DETAILSPREVIOUS ANSWERSSCALCET8 5.5.502.XP.MI:Evaluate the integral bY making the given substitution. (Use for the constant of integration.)x(s + *)8 dx, U =5-XH[s++*j ~CEnhanced reedbacicpaseagain Reca the substitution rule for indefinite integrals:gx)differentiable 'unction Khose rangean interyaand Fie contintousthen((g(*)lg (*Jax =(uldu.Need Help?Iaalaih
[0/1 Points] DETAILS PREVIOUS ANSWERS SCALCET8 5.5.502.XP.MI: Evaluate the integral bY making the given substitution. (Use for the constant of integration.) x(s + *)8 dx, U =5-X H[s++*j ~C Enhanced reedbacic pase again Reca the substitution rule for indefinite integrals: gx) differentiable 'unc...
5 answers
Acrosonic'$ production department estlmates that the total cost (In dollars) Incurred where R(x) the revenue iunction dollars and denotes the quantity demanded. C(x) T70x 15000 R(*) 0.04+2 BOOx (a) Find the profit function Ax) 04x2 630x - 15000ManuraccurinoElectroStat speaker systemsfirst year production wlllrepresentec by the following function,(b) Find the margina profit function{~)Compute the following values (3400) (9800)Need Help?Kalch @tTelaolu Tytot
Acrosonic'$ production department estlmates that the total cost (In dollars) Incurred where R(x) the revenue iunction dollars and denotes the quantity demanded. C(x) T70x 15000 R(*) 0.04+2 BOOx (a) Find the profit function Ax) 04x2 630x - 15000 Manuraccurino ElectroStat speaker systems first ye...
5 answers
Use the matrices below to perform matrix multiplication A*B.[3 ~57 A=io L2B = [12 1
Use the matrices below to perform matrix multiplication A*B. [3 ~57 A=io L2 B = [12 1...
5 answers
Find the general solution y(z) to the differential equationSy" + 3y' + 9y = 0Hint: Find a rCal root T1 of the cubic characteristic polynomial then divide the characteristic polynomial by r T1 to get the quotient quadratic; which will factor easily.
Find the general solution y(z) to the differential equation Sy" + 3y' + 9y = 0 Hint: Find a rCal root T1 of the cubic characteristic polynomial then divide the characteristic polynomial by r T1 to get the quotient quadratic; which will factor easily....
5 answers
Question 80.25Which statement is NOT true about enzyme inhibition?"In competitive inhibition, the inhibitor binds to the active site of the enzyme_"In noncompetitive inhibition, the inhibitor binds to the allosteric site of the enzymeMost inhibitors act in a reversible fashion:All of the statements are true;
Question 8 0.25 Which statement is NOT true about enzyme inhibition? "In competitive inhibition, the inhibitor binds to the active site of the enzyme_ "In noncompetitive inhibition, the inhibitor binds to the allosteric site of the enzyme Most inhibitors act in a reversible fashion: All of...
1 answers
Example 2 & Explain how to use convolution along with the formula C(e"r) = Ato find the following inverse Laplace transform; '{56+56 - Show -de AnswerRrawer:0(6 f) _2-50
Example 2 & Explain how to use convolution along with the formula C(e"r) = Ato find the following inverse Laplace transform; '{56+56 - Show -de Answer Rrawer: 0(6 f) _ 2-50...
5 answers
04,Are the expressions in Problcms 17-26 cquivalent?4 and as + 04 - {p + 70 + 401
04, Are the expressions in Problcms 17-26 cquivalent? 4 and as + 04 - {p + 70 + 401...
5 answers
309459Two blocks and B lying on frictionless surface shown in Figure 2, are connected by cord passing over a small frictionless pulley_ Draw an FBD for each block (b) What is the tension in the cord? Calculate the mass of block B which slides down the plane that keeps the system moving at constant speed: Neglect the mass of the pulley and the cord. (d) Repeat parts a, b, and C, for the case where the surfaces has coefficient of kinetic friction Uk 0.2_10 Kg
309 459 Two blocks and B lying on frictionless surface shown in Figure 2, are connected by cord passing over a small frictionless pulley_ Draw an FBD for each block (b) What is the tension in the cord? Calculate the mass of block B which slides down the plane that keeps the system moving at constant...
5 answers
What are the Differences between anterograde or retrograde vesicle trafficking
what are the Differences between anterograde or retrograde vesicle trafficking...
5 answers
Consider a reaction: A → Products. The reaction is first–orderwith a rate constant of 0.0067 s–1 and occurs at 155°C. Answer thefollowing questions. (a) Calculate the molarity of A after 25minutes if the initial concentration is 0.552 M at 155°C.
Consider a reaction: A → Products. The reaction is first–order with a rate constant of 0.0067 s–1 and occurs at 155°C. Answer the following questions. (a) Calculate the molarity of A after 25 minutes if the initial concentration is 0.552 M at 155°C....
5 answers
Problem 1 For constanth AII] solve tke didferential eqquationW euslownin(a)with initiul cotliticn (4,6). Ax [urt of your solution. iuelude sne graphs of your dilfercnt pursuit cuTVG for ifletett wulutn ol W. and ".
Problem 1 For constanth AII] solve tke didferential eqquation W euslo wnin(a) with initiul cotliticn (4,6). Ax [urt of your solution. iuelude sne graphs of your dilfercnt pursuit cuTVG for ifletett wulutn ol W. and "....

-- 0.018318--